Spotlight on a Third Rail Inverter for NYC Subway Construction

New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has a tremendous amount of construction to conduct. The MTA is expanding its subway system in an effort to ease train congestion for commuters and to reach areas of the big city that were left off the subway grid. Where there’s train construction there are workers using complex tools, and these tools need a power source like our portable third rail inverterPCTI‘s third rail inverter provides an easy way to provide power for hand tools or other machines such as compressors by connecting it easily to the 600V DC third rail.

The two new editions to the NYC subway system will be the Second Avenue subway line or T train, and the expansion of the 7 train to 34thStreet and 11th Avenue. With housing, restaurants and entertainment on the far west side of Manhattan, the MTA has been incentivized to give 7 train access to people traveling past 8th Avenue. The Second Avenue line will make trips along the city’s east side quicker and less cramped.

With the city investing $6.85 billion in these two projects, New York officials are going to want to use the best portable third rail inverter they can find to run track tools and move maintenance or permanent installations like car signals. Our inverter technology offers the ability to use dirty power from a third rail within 300V to 700VDC and alter it to clean sine wave power capable of running the most sensitive electronic equipment. This trumps the power provided by most other companies’ third rail inverters.

Getting the job done is important, and so is the well being of all the subway workers. Our inverter offers safety features that protect maintenance personnel as well as the inverter itself, thanks to its complete dead front design with no metal parts. It can even stand up to input polarity reversal.

This type of equipment isn’t just for rail expansion, though. After the New York City metro area was devastated by Hurricane Sandy last October, most of the subway system was restored within eight days of the superstorm. Travelers using stations like the South Ferry terminal in lower Manhattan or the Rockaway bound A train weren’t as lucky. The $500 million maintenance project to repair the South Ferry terminal started six months after Sandy, and Rockaway service on the A line didn’t resume service until Memorial Day. Both of these efforts wouldn’t have been possible without equipment like our portable third rail inverter.

As NYC moves forward with its lengthy projects to expand the subway system, construction crews will need power underground. Products like our portable third rail inverter are exactly what construction workers need to conveniently power their tools down in the tunnels.